Satan Ransomware Variant Exploits 10 Server-Side Flaws

By December 10, 2018 March 13th, 2019 News

Jai Vijayan at Dark Reading writes:

Windows, Linux systems vulnerable to self-propagating ‘Lucky’ malware, security researchers say.

A new version of ransomware that first surfaced about two years ago is garnering attention for its ability to spread via as many as ten different vulnerabilities in Windows and Linux server platforms.

“Lucky,” as the new malware is called, is a variant of Satan, a data encryption tool that first became available via a ransomware-as-a-service offering in January 2017. Like Satan, Lucky also is worm-like in behavior and capable of spreading on its own with no human interaction at all.

“There is a risk of extensive infections because [of the] big arsenal of vulnerabilities that [the malware] attempts to exploit,” says Apostolos Giannakidis, security architect at Waratek, which also posted a blog on the threat.

All of the vulnerabilities are easy to exploit, and actual exploits are publicly available for many of them that allow attackers to compromise vulnerable systems with little to no customization required, he says. Several of the vulnerabilities used by Lucky were disclosed just a few months ago, which means that the risk of infection is big for organizations that have not yet patched their systems, Giannakidis says.

All but one of the server-side vulnerabilities that Lucky uses affect Java server apps. “The vulnerabilities that affect JBoss, Tomcat, WebLogic, Apache Struts 2, and Spring Data Commons are all remote code execution vulnerabilities that allow attackers to easily execute OS commands on any platform,” he notes.

Lucky is an example of how attackers have evolved ransomware tools over the past two- to three years. Instead of targeting OS vulnerabilities—such as Windows SMB protocol—on desktop and other end-user systems, attackers have pivoted to attacking servers instead, Giannakidis notes.

“Instead of targeting OS vulnerabilities their focus is now applications and services on servers,” Giannakidis says. “This is also evident by the fact that the ransomware targets Linux systems, which are primarily used for servers.”

One reason for the shift in attacks could be that patching server-side applications is a considerably more difficult task than patching desktops. Servers with vulnerabilities in them are likely to remain unpatched—and therefore exposed to attack—for longer periods than vulnerable end-user systems, Giannakidis notes. “According to recent studies, organizations need on average at least three to four months to patch known vulnerabilities with windows of exposure of more than one year to be very common in the enterprise world.”

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